Knock this off: Storage Headboard

Well it’s springtime, and I’m in full home decor/rearrange mode again.  I had been wanting to get to work on our Master Bedroom, and had a few projects and dilemmas lined up.  As you may know, with home projects one project often-times depends on another.  For instance, I had planned on rearranging the room but we planned on laying down laminate floors, so it would be pointless to move everything around just to move it all out again.  This is a project we had planned on doing since last March.  We had the supplies, but since we were doing it DIY style, we had to do it when we could.  Well, we finally got around to the floors this past weekend.  We spent all day Saturday laying down the flooring and now I can move on to the other projects, yay me!  I’m still sore all over, but the floors look smashing, and it totally changes the mood of the room!

One of the major dilemmas for the room had to do with the positioning of the bed.  The geniuses who installed the duct work thought the lone vent in the room would be perfect in the most logical place the bed!  (Gotta love old homes and all the retrofitting involved). Since we have a king sized bed, this poses a problem.  I didn’t really think it would be the best move to heat/cool just under our bed!  As an added dilemma, there is no space for beside tables on which to place books/magazines, lamps, a glass of water, etc.   Since The Man refuses to downsize to a queen or full, I had to find a creative solution. I have mulled this over for the past few months, but I believe I have found the right solution!

Enter the Bookcase headboard! I knew I would have to build some kind of shelf behind the headboard, and I came up with a few ideas, but I think this is by far the best.  I saw this on BHG.com, and I can’t wait to get it done.  I already have 2 small Ikea bookshelves (Flarke, discontinued, damn!).  They are a bit short, so I think I will build a box base to raise them up so that we can use more of the shelves. I will also make a headboard to go across the bottom part of the bookshelves so that we are not bumping our heads agains the shelves.  I will post pics when the project is done.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Empty Juice Carton for Mailing

When I was a young (crafty) child fresh off the plane from Nigeria, I was amazed at how much useful stuff people would throw out. This led to me saving a whole bunch of those styrofoam trays from the grocery store. I just knew they could be turned into something. I made lots of picture frames, but after a while, I had to let them go because they were rapidly piling up. This was a pivotal point in my ‘junk to treasure’ attitude. Today, I still love to save little bottles, cans, boxes, etc to be used for something later. More and more lately I’m finding things that can be reused. This goes with the whole GREEN movement, but hey, I was Green before Green was green!

It is my aim with my etsy shop to use as many ‘upcycled’ items in my work as possible. I am really impressed with the things I’ve been able to make from household discards. Following is a tutorial for a small shipping box.

Small Shipping box from a drink carton.
——————————–

If your household is anything like mine, you go through a lot of containers: Cereal boxes, soup cans, soymilk cartons, jugs, etc. It kills me to throw these things away, so I’ve been saving them to use. Here’s a pictorial of me making a small shipping box with an empty juice carton (you know, the dole/welch’s juice kind)

You will need:
-Craft Knife with a fairly sharp blade (I used my trusty 10 year old X-acto)
-tape
-paper to wrap the box in (as USPS won’t allow you to use any old box)
-small item to be shipped.

Steps:

Step 1. Cut off the triangular shaped top of the box.
Step 2: Slice each of the four corners to the desired depth toaccomodate whatever object you’re sending. I just eyeballed it, but if you’re anal about this type of stuff you can measure.
Step 3: Fold down each of the four sides, and crease.
Step 4: Place the object to be mailed in the box, fold down the flaps and secure the box with tape.


mailing_box_steps

 

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

When I was a young (crafty) child fresh off the plane from Nigeria, I was amazed at how much useful stuff people would throw out. This led to me saving a whole bunch of those styrofoam trays from the grocery store. I just knew they could be turned into something. I made lots of picture frames, but after a while, I had to let them go because they were rapidly piling up. This was a pivotal point in my ‘junk to treasure’ attitude. Today, I still love to save little bottles, cans, boxes, etc to be used for something later. More and more lately I’m finding things that can be reused. This goes with the whole GREEN movement, but hey, I was Green before Green was green!

It is my aim with my etsy shop to use as many ‘upcycled’ items in my work as possible. I am really impressed with the things I’ve been able to make from household discards. Following is a tutorial for a small shipping box.

Small Shipping box from a drink carton.
——————————–

If your household is anything like mine, you go through a lot of containers: Cereal boxes, soup cans, soymilk cartons, jugs, etc. It kills me to throw these things away, so I’ve been saving them to use. Here’s a pictorial of me making a small shipping box with an empty juice carton (you know, the dole/welch’s juice kind)

You will need:
-Craft Knife with a fairly sharp blade (I used my trusty 10 year old X-acto)
-tape
-paper to wrap the box in (as USPS won’t allow you to use any old box)
-small item to be shipped.

Steps:

Step 1. Cut off the triangular shaped top of the box.
Step 2: Slice each of the four corners to the desired depth toaccomodate whatever object you’re sending. I just eyeballed it, but if you’re anal about this type of stuff you can measure.
Step 3: Fold down each of the four sides, and crease.
Step 4: Place the object to be mailed in the box, fold down the flaps and secure the box with tape.